Membership
2.1.1 Membership Categories
Membership in Troop 216 consists of four categories:
  1. Scouts

Boys who meet BSA age requirements, are currently registered with the BSA as Troop 216 Scouts, and are active in the troop.  See 3.2.5.

  1. Uniformed Adult Leaders

Adults who meet BSA age requirements, are currently registered with the BSA as Troop 216 Scoutmaster, assistant Scoutmasters.

  1. Troop Committee Members

Adults who meet BSA age requirements, are currently registered with the BSA as Troop 216 Committee members, and are currently active in an assigned area of committee responsibility.

  1. Troop Parents (Member Families)
Parents and minor brothers and sisters of Scout members, or the spouse and minor children of registered adult members.

While other relatives and friends are welcome at courts of honor, most other activities are restricted to one or more member categories.

2.1.1.1 Scouts
Eligibility
Scouts shall be at least 11 years old, or have completed the 5 th grade, or have earned the Arrow of Light, but not yet be 18 years old at time of registration. There is no requirement that a boy must have been a Cub Scout or Webelos Scout in order to join the troop.

The new charter year begins January 1 st of each year. Only Scouts whose registrations are current may participate in troop activities.

Process
Upon joining Troop 216, each Scout must provide the following:
  • BSA Application with appropriate fees.
  • Along with and then annually, provide:
  • Troop 216 Registration Form with appropriate fees.
  • Personal Health and Medical Records Part A and Part B.
  • Parental Consent and Medical Release.
  • Transportation information.

Please be sure the Scoutmaster is aware of any special needs, circumstances or financial hardships.

Limitations
Any interested boy who meets the membership requirements above may register with Troop 216, subject to the restrictions in this section. The most desirable entry period is from January through May, so that new members can attend summer camp. The troop always admits younger brothers or sons of present or former members in good standing regardless of the present membership level.


Participation and Commitment
Upon receipt of the required paperwork and fees, each boy will be assigned to a patrol with Scouts of his own age and when possible with whom he has previously been involved in Scouting. A troop guide will be assigned to each patrol of first year Scouts when possible.

A Scout must be active to reap the benefit of the Troop 216 program. Camping is the heart of Scouting, and the troop expects Scouts to attend overnight camping trips and make every effort to attend annual summer camp.

Scouts who make commitments to participate in troop activities should faithfully keep all such commitments.  Failure to keep these commitments without a valid excuse shows poor Scout spirit and may be considered at time of advancement.

Scouts who have signed up for an event will be expected to pay for the event. It is the discretion of the Scoutmaster and Committee Chair if the Scout is to receive a refund for the event that he could not attend.

In order to attend outings or activities and advance in rank, Troop 216 Scouts must be active. This means they should meet the following:
  1. Attendance at a minimum of 1 monthly regular troop meeting.

  2. Attendance at a minimum of 1 outing per quarter.

  3. Attendance at 25% of other troop activities. (courts of honor, Scout Sunday, and other troop functions.)

  4. Wearing a clean, neat and properly configured Scout uniform.

  5. Set a good example for others to follow by following the Scout Law and Scout Oath.

  6. A “current” status for re-charter fees.


Scouts not considered active cannot advance in rank or participate in outings or activities without meeting with the Scoutmaster. The Scoutmaster will develop a plan of action, to help the Scout attain active status in the troop.
2.1.1.2 Uniformed Adult Leaders (Scouters)
Adults serving Scouting in uniform are called “Scouters.” Scouters hold titles such as Scoutmaster, assistant Scoutmasters, Troop Committee Chair, etc.

Scouters provide guidance for the youth leaders of the troop. In addition, they sign off on requirements as Scouts work towards their next rank.

Eligibility
Minimum requirements for adults in the troop:
  • Must be BSA registered.
  • Must take Youth Protection training (BSA requirement).
  • Must take Safe Environment Training (chartered organization requirement).
  • Be approved by the chartered organization, the Troop Committee Chair (in consultation with the troop committee), and the Scoutmaster (in consultation with the other uniformed leaders).

Process
Upon joining Troop 216, each Scouter must provide the following:
  • BSA Adult Application with appropriate fees.

Along with and then annually, provide:
  • Troop 216 Registration Form with appropriate fees.
  • Personal Health and Medical Records Part A and Part B.
  • Transportation information.

Youth Protection
The following policies have been adopted by the Boy Scouts of America to provide additional security for youth and to protect adult leaders from situations in which they may be vulnerable to allegations of abuse.
  
  • Two-deep leadership: Always having at least 2 adults present at every trip or outing.
  • Open Doors: In situations requiring a personal interview such as Scoutmaster’s conference between a leader and a Scout, the meeting should be conducted in view of at least one other adult. Closed door contact between an adult and a Scout is not permitted.
  • Respect for privacy: Respect for the privacy of others is expected at all times, this includes when others are bathing or sleeping.
  • Separate accommodations: No youth is permitted to sleep in the tent of an adult who is not that youth’s own parent or guardian.
  • Separate showers and toilet facilities must be provided for males and females, and if separate facilities are not available, separate times for male and female use of showers should be scheduled and posted.
  • No secret organization: The Boy Scouts of America does not recognize any secret organization. All aspects of Scouting are open at all times for observation by parents or guardians and troop leaders.
  • No hazing: Physical hazing and initiations are strictly prohibited at all times by the Boy Scouts of America.

Safe Environment Training
The Safe Environment Program of the Diocese of Raleigh and St. Michael Catholic Church strives to create and foster safe and healthy environments for children and youth in all aspects of their lives.  This class describes how to recognize child abuse and neglect.  St. Michael Catholic Church requires anyone who works with children in any capacity to be trained in Safe Environment at a Level C and re-certify every five years.  See  http://www.stmichaelcary.org/safeenvironment or the Training Coordinator on the troop committee for more information.

Two Deep Leadership is required for all Scout activities.
Two registered adult leaders, or one adult leader and a Scout parent, both of whom must be at least 21 years of age, are required for all Troop 216 meetings, trips or outings. From the Youth Protection training, this is known as two-deep leadership.

Wood Badge
Wood Badge training, the highest level of adult Scout leader training is highly recommended to all Scouters.  The program teaches team leadership and problem-solving skills, delivered through a lecture classroom environment and a short outdoor camping experience.

2.1.1.3 Troop Committee Members
The troop committee oversees the operations and activities of the troop, and it is comprised of the Committee Chair and committee members.  The troop committee shall meet on a regular monthly basis as best suits the schedules of the members, but the committee may be called upon at any time to make decisions outside the regularly scheduled meetings.

SEE 2.1.1.2 Uniformed Adult Leaders (Scouters) above for Process, Eligibility and Training.

In addition, they must take the Committee Challenge training. (BSA requirement).

2.1.1.4 Troop Parents
Troop 216 is not a “drop off” Scouting experience.

Troop records show that most Scouts whose parents are not involved as leaders or on the committee do poorly in Scouting. Troop 216 expects at least one parent from every family to be actively involved with the troop. It is the responsibility of the Scoutmaster and troop committee to determine what level of involvement is acceptable

Troop 216 expects at least one parent from every family to be actively involved.


Role/Expectations
The role of parents within Troop 216 is to be supportive of the troop's efforts and to encourage the Scouts to learn and excel. It is also an expectation that parents, to the extent that they are able:
  
  • Read their Scout's handbook and understand the program offered and methods of Scouting.
  • Actively follow their Scout's progress (or lack thereof) and offer encouragement and a push when needed, however allow your Scout to be in charge of his own pace and rank advancements.  Boy Scouting is boy led.
  • Show support to both the individual Scout and the troop by attending all courts of honor
  • Participate in the Luminaria fundraiser.
    • Note: Participation is a Troop 216 requirement for all Scouts and parents as it is the primary fundraiser for Troop 216 and provides most of the budget for troop activities.
  • Be aware of the troop program and annual calendar.
  • Volunteer for adult leader positions in the troop including assistant Scoutmaster, troop committee member, merit badge counselor, or other areas of identified need.

    ALL parent volunteers MUST complete the Youth Protection training available online as well as take the Safe Environment Training (SET).


Training
SEE 2.1.1.2 Uniformed Adult Leaders (Scouters) above for information on Youth Protection and Safe Environment Training.

NOTE: You do not have to be a registered member or have a member ID to take Youth Protection training.

If you choose to submit a volunteer application to become a committee member or Scout leader you will also be submitting the BSA application to our troop as well.  When your volunteer application is approved, you will receive a BSA membership card which includes your member ID number. After you receive your membership card, log back into the MyScouting.org portal, click on My Profile and update the system by inputting your member ID number.  This will link your Youth Protection training records, and any other training, in MyScouting.org to your BSA membership.

A fair and equitable share of assistance is expected from each parent or guardian. Parents will be asked to furnish transportation to and from campouts and troop activities.

Parents are encouraged to observe weekly troop meetings, but be mindful that these are the Scouts’ meetings that have been organized by the PLC.

Trained parents are also welcome to attend various camping trips and events, but are asked to remember when on camping trips, their sons are Troop 216 Scouts and should, please refrain from interfering in patrol activities, let the troop leadership work with the Scouts.  REMINDER: All parents attending troop camping trips MUST have taken Youth Protection training and Safe Environment Training.
2.1.1.5 Adult Involvement
The success of the troop and the Scouts depends upon the support and participation of parents. However, the type of participation in a Boy Scout troop can be varied.
  • Supporting your Scout is critical. Encourage (and occasionally prod) him to attend activities and accomplish the requirements for rank advancement and for merit badges. Help him step up to his responsibilities.

  • Opportunities to become active in the troop committee and adult troop meetings. Parents can assist the troop by becoming merit badge counselors or assisting in planning campouts, among other responsibilities. All adults who desire to actively support the troop are encouraged to go through Adult Leader training. This training helps adults understand how to help the Scouts grow and how a troop functions.

  • Opportunities for those whose interests lean away from camping, the troop can always use help in other areas. For example, successful campouts take a lot of planning and advance work; enthusiastic merit badge counselors can help get Scouts excited about earning merit badges; hospitality hosts are needed for courts of honor; and the Scouts need to get those rank and merit badges sewn on quickly.
  • Opportunities to participate in transportation for campouts, attend monthly campouts, and go to summer camp.
2.1.2 Standards of Membership
General
The following sections are provided to assist the Scouts, their parents, the Scout leaders and the troop committee in working towards the common goal of making the Scouting experience happy and successful, but providing a detailed description of some of the requirements for advancement.

Adherence to the Troop 216 Handbook and Guide
  1. Each Scout’s parent(s) or guardian should be made aware of Troop 216's Handbook and Guide upon joining the troop.  It’s available electronically on the website and a printed copy will be provided upon request.

  2. By participating in the activities of Troop 216, the Scout has signified that he has read, understood, and agrees to abide by the policies contained in the Handbook and Guide.

  3. By allowing the Scout to participate in the activities of Troop 216, the parent(s) or guardian has signified that he/she has read, understood, and agrees to abide by the policies contained in the Handbook and Guide.


Scouts should inform the Scoutmaster if they cannot be present for regular troop meetings and activities. For example, if participation in a sport will prevent them from attending troop meetings for a period of time, the Scoutmaster needs to know this. But during this time the Scout should stay informed of the troop’s activities and try to attend any meetings or outings if at all possible.

To retain full membership in Troop 216, a Scout must be active in the troop, adhere to its uniform standards and meet the behavior expectations.

Active Standard
A Scout must meet the troop's active service standard for meetings and campouts to be eligible for ANY advancement. A Scout must meet the standard for at least the minimum.

The rank requirements for Star, Life, and Eagle have mandatory time periods that a Scout must be active in his troop to advance in rank. The definition of “active” is defined by national standards and is not subject to troop modification.
  
The Scout is registered.
 
AND
The Scout is in good standing.

A Scout is considered in “good standing” with his unit as long as he has not been dismissed for disciplinary reasons.
OR
The Scout meets the unit’s reasonable expectations.

For Troop 216 those expectations are:
  • He attends at least one meeting a month
  • He attends at least one campout per quarter
  • He attends at least 25% of other troop activities
  • He is current with his recharter fees
EQUALS AN ACTIVE SCOUT

Complete and correct uniform required. 

Uniform Standard
It is the policy of Troop 216 that all Scouts should wear the official uniform of the Boy Scouts of America to all troop meetings (including neckerchief) and outings (neckerchief generally not required), in addition to their Boy Scout handbook, pen, and papers. 

Behavior Standard
Each scout is expected at all times to conduct himself with the highest standards in accordance with the Scout Oath and Law. In addition, Scouts are responsible for following the instructions of junior leaders and adult leaders and for behaving in a safe, cooperative, and conscientious manner at all troop meetings and activities.

Parents are encouraged to remind their Scouts that his behavior during Scouting activities will reflect on his patrol, the troop, his family, and all who contribute their time and attention to his support.

Misconduct or repetitive inappropriate behavior will not be tolerated and will be recorded and remain in the troop records.

Examples of unacceptable behavior and misconduct, include, but are not limited to:
  • Safety violations leading to the endangerment of others or self-including failure to follow instructions
  • Theft and willful disobedience to either Scouts, Scout leaders or adults
  • Acting in a disrespectful or discriminating manner
  • Disobeying rules of the activity
  • Being uncooperative
  • Intentionally damaging property or equipment
  • Physical aggression or name calling
  • Threatening violence towards another person or intimidation
  • Leaving a designated area without permission from a leader
  • Using inappropriate language or gestures, profanity
  • Hazing or bullying
  • Cheating, gambling, dishonesty, theft
  • Possession of fireworks, weapons or pornography
  • Inappropriate sexual behavior, conduct, or harassment

If such behavior cannot be altered by the boy himself, measures may be taken by youth and adult leadership to assure the group is not adversely affected.  Scouts unable to follow the Behavior Standards or policies of the troop will be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with this Handbook and Guide.
  
  1. The Scoutmaster or his representative will have final decision on the discipline of Scouts while participating in troop activities and outings.
  2. The Scoutmaster, assistant Scoutmasters, and/or the troop committee shall have the authority and discretion to contact parents/guardians to pick up a Scout from an event regardless of time or place of the event if the infraction is serious enough to warrant such action. If this occurs, the parents/guardians of the Scout will be required to make arrangements to take custody of the Scout. The troop shall not be liable for any costs involved; these will be solely the parents’/guardians' responsibility.
  3. Serious conduct or discipline issues will be addressed by the troop committee. The Committee Chair may assemble a disciplinary committee to address the issue and keep the Scout’s privacy in mind.
  4. The cost for repair/replacement of any troop equipment damaged by willful misconduct is the responsibility of the Scout and parent(s)/guardian(s).


The Scoutmaster has the authority to discipline a Scout, including temporary or permanent suspension, for conduct inconsistent with the Scouting ideals.

Disciplinary Actions
  1. For minor infractions, an adult leader following Two-Deep leadership protocols, will counsel the Scout, explain the nature of the misbehavior, and offer suggestions for improvement. 
  2. In any instance where a Scout shows flagrant disregard for junior or adult supervision or a disregard for matters involving safety, the Scout will be immediately suspended from troop activities and directly remanded to parental supervision.
  3. If a Scout fails to respond appropriately to guidance from junior and adult leaders, the Scout’s parent or guardian will be notified and asked to intervene to correct the Scout’s behavior.
  4. If a Scout fails to respond to intervention by parent or guardians, the troop committee will schedule a meeting with the parent or guardian to develop a mutually agreeable plan to help the Scout correct the behavior. The troop committee may decide to require parental supervision during troop activities and/or to restrict the Scout’s participation in some or all troop activities.
  5. In the event the behavior continues, a special disciplinary board of review (consisting of the Scoutmaster, assistant Scoutmaster, two registered adult members and the Chartered Organization Representative) may be held for consideration of further action. This may include suspension or immediate and permanent dismissal from the troop.

NO RIGHT TO DUE PROCESS; NO APPEAL . The Boy Scouts of America is a private organization, and there is no right to due process in making a determination as to the appropriate disciplinary measures, including suspension or dismissal. The decision of the troop committee, the chartered organization representative, and/or the Occonnechee Council, BSA, shall be final and not subject to appeal.

NO RIGHT TO PROGRESSIVE DISCIPLINE These troop procedures are not meant to confer or imply any right to progressive discipline or punishment, and permanent dismissal from the troop may be the first action taken, if the actions of the offending individual deemed to be of sufficient severity.

Any actions, which might involve disciplinary action, should be dealt with in strict confidence. The Scout's parents should be fully informed of the issue. Because serious or recurring behavioral problems may require the troop committee's involvement, the Scoutmaster should share discipline problems with the Committee Chair. Such problems should be addressed in a firm, fair manner with the goal to integrate the youth into the Scouting program. Problems that may lead to a youth's permanent removal from the troop should be handled by the troop committee and the Scoutmaster, and should involve the Scout's parents or guardians. Together, the troop committee, parents, and Scoutmaster should work toward a solution with the troop's best interest in mind.

The parent of a Scout involved in a disciplinary action, who is the Scoutmaster, outing leader involved, or the Committee Chair, shall defer to another leader or committee member during problem resolution. Any disciplinary action will include conditions, if any, under which the Scout may return to the troop's regular program.

Removal of Adults
The chartered organization may remove any adult leader, in accordance with BSA policy. In general, the chartered organization leaves such actions within the troop, stepping in only when necessary.

Scoutmaster
The Scoutmaster serves at the pleasure of the chartered organization and troop committee. He may be removed only by joint action of the chartered organization and troop committee.

Assistant Scoutmaster
Assistant Scoutmasters serve at the pleasure of the Scoutmaster and troop committee. They may be removed only by joint action of the Scoutmaster and troop committee. This does not preclude the Scoutmaster’s authority to dismiss a leader from a troop activity for cause, pending later action of the troop committee.

Chartered Representative
The Chartered Representative serves at the pleasure of the Institutional Head. He may be removed by action of the chartered organization, or by request of the troop committee to the chartered organization.

Committee Chair
The Committee Chair serves at the pleasure of the chartered organization. He may be removed by action of the chartered organization, or by request of the troop committee to the chartered organization.

Committee Member
Troop committee members serve at the pleasure of the Committee Chair. They may be removed only by joint action of the committee chair and the troop committee.

Merit Badge Counselor
Merit badge counselors serve at the pleasure of the troop committee. They may be removed by the troop committee, or at the request of the Scoutmaster to the committee.

Parent of Scout
Parents of currently active Scouts are normally permitted full access to troop activities, with the exception of certain activities that have adult participation restrictions. The troop committee may restrict parent participation or remove all participation privileges in special situations (court-ordered custody restrictions, legal convictions, etc.) as necessary for the safety and well-being of the Scouts.

Grievances
Use of the chain-of-command within both the youth and adult leadership is encouraged whenever possible.  For minor grievances, Scouts should first talk with their patrol leader, who may take the matter up with the senior patrol leader. The senior patrol leader, in turn may utilize the patrol leaders council and/or the Scoutmaster as resources to settle disputes or resolve issues. Similarly, adult leaders are encouraged to bring issues to the Scoutmaster’s attention for resolution. The Scoutmaster may utilize the troop committee as necessary.
illustration
For major grievances, disputes, matters of safety, and infractions of the behavior standard, they should go to any adult leader directly for resolution.

Parents who perceive inequities or significant infractions of the troop's policies of conduct, or wish to discuss any issue, are encouraged to speak to the senior patrol leader along with the Scoutmaster to resolve any concerns.  The Troop Committee Chair will handle grievances of parents/guardians.
2.2 Troop Organization
2.2.1 Boy Scout Councils and Districts
The national headquarters for Boy Scouts of America is located in Irving, Texas and is referred to as the National Council. A council is defined as an administrative body chartered to be responsible for Scouting in a designated geographic territory. The National Council charters about 300 local councils across the United States. The program for each local council is directed by a local executive board of volunteers and administered by a local scout executive and local professional staff.

Each local council is divided up into smaller geographic areas called districts. Within each district are Scouting units. Each district has a professional district executive, a volunteer district commissioner, and an all-volunteer district committee. Together, these individuals administer the Scouting program within their district.

illustrationTroop 216 is part of the Crosswinds District ( www.crosswinds.cary.nc.us ) which is part of the Occoneechee Council (www.ocscouts.org ), The troop participates in a number of activities during the year that are sponsored by the district and council, including the district camporee, the council camporee, and the Scouting for Food drive.
2.2.2 Program Year
Troop 216 begins its program year in late August.  It meets regularly through May, attends summer camp in late June and may attend High Adventure in July. Planning meetings are held twice a year to plan out programming details for the following 6 month period.  E.g. Meeting held in January to plan activities for the June to December timeframe.  Activities will then be matched up to ASM leadership, preliminary funding requests determined and then presented to the committee for approval.  Once approved, they will be added to the troop calendar on the website.  Changes will be conveyed verbally at troop meeting.  Check the website calendar for the latest information.
2.2.3 Meetings
The troop schedule is divided into a number of different activities that are described in the following sections.

Regular Troop Meetings
Troop meetings are held on the 1 st, 2nd , 4th (and 5 th) Tuesday from 7:30 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. at St. Michael Catholic Church, 804 High House Road, Cary, NC 27513.  A troop meeting schedule will be available at the beginning of each school year. Typically, Tuesday holidays are observed by the troop, however, occasionally the troop meets on those holidays if needed for planning outings. There are no regular troop meetings in late June, July or early August.

Patrol Leaders Council
The PLC meets on the 3rd Tuesday of each month at 7:00p.m at St. Michael Catholic Church, 804 High House Road, Cary, NC 27513.

Committee Meetings
The troop committee meets on the 3 rd Wednesday of each month.

Boards of Review
After completing the requirements for a rank advancement, each Scout will meet with the Scoutmaster for a Scoutmaster conference. Next, a Scout will schedule a board of review with the Advancement Chair. A Scout must wear his full uniform and bring his Scout Handbook and necessary paperwork to participate.

Boards of review are conducted by committee members. Troop leaders (Scoutmaster and assistant Scoutmasters) and parents of their own son do not sit on the scout’s board of review.

Courts of Honor
A court of honor recognizes Scouts who have received rank advancement and/or badges.  It is typically scheduled in August, February and May and takes the place of a regular troop meeting.  It is extremely important that parents attend to hear about upcoming troop activities and other important announcements.

District Roundtable
Adults of the troop are encouraged to attend these monthly meetings on the 3 rd Thursday of the month from 7:00pm-8:30pm. The purpose of district roundtable is to present current plans for the district and on-going opportunities for training.
2.2.4 Charter Organization
Sponsor
Troop 216 is sponsored by the Knights of Columbus Msgr Michael A.  Carey, Council #6650.  The chartered organization is obligated by the BSA Charter agreement to provide an adequate meeting space, including storage for troop equipment, and to secure and approve new troop adult leaders. The chartered organization appoints a chartered organization representative to be the key liaison between the troop and the chartered organization. The chartered organization has the ultimate responsibility to ensure that the troop operates in full accord with all BSA policies.

Chartered Organization Representative (COR)
The charter organization representative (COR) has the ultimate responsibility – and hence, the ultimate authority – over the governing and operation of the troop. The COR also reviews and approves all applications for adult leadership.  They are a part of the troop committee and are a voting member of the Occoneechee Council. The representative ensures that the troop has adequate meeting facilities and that the troop is providing a good program for the boys.
2.2.5 Troop Committee
The troop committee functions as an administration and support organization for the troop. The troop committee takes care of the non-program issues, such as Ttoop finances, fund raising activities, membership drives, website management, activity permits and coordination, advancement records, procurement, and maintenance of troop equipment. The troop committee has a very important role in the rank advancement process of the Scouts. troop committee members sit on the board of reviews and make the decision if a Scout is ready for the next stage in their Scouting journey.

Members
Chartered Organization Representative (COR)
  • Member of St. Michael Catholic Church.
  • Serves as an interface between the church and the troop.
Committee Chair
  • Responsible for scheduling, setting the agenda and chairing the troop committee meetings.
  • Interfaces on a regular basis with the Scoutmaster.
  • Serves at the pleasure of the Chartered Organization.
  • Recruits members to fill the troop committee and is responsible for overseeing all committee members.
Treasurer
  • Maintains the troop bank accounts, ensuring that sufficient funds are available to cover authorized expenses.
  • Collects and disburses funds for special activities.
Advancement Chair
  • Works with a 3-member board made of committee members to ensure a Scout has completed rank requirements. 
  • Inquire about the Scout's overall troop experience.
  • Encourage a Scout's progress in Scouting.
Luminaria Coordinator
(Fundraising)
  • Works in conjunction with the PLC and the troop committee in planning and coordinating all fund raising activities.
Secretary
  • Takes and distributes minutes of the troop committee meetings and other activities the Chair may assign.
Quartermaster
(Equipment Coordinator)
  • Works with the Scout Quartermaster.
  • Maintains an inventory of troop equipment.
  • Informs the troop committee when new equipment needs to be purchased.
Membership Coordinator
  • Re-charters the troop.
  • Collects and maintains medical forms.
  • Collects and maintains permission forms.
Chaplain
  • Serves a mentor to the Chaplain’s Aide.
  • Coordinates religious awards available for Scouts.
  • Coordinates volunteer activities with St. Michael’s Catholic Church. (E.g. fish fries, Luminary assistance etc.)
Merit Badge Coordinator
  • Maintains records of advancement for Scouts.
  • Identifies merit badge counselors either from within the resources of the troop, or from the district.
Board of Review Coordinator
  • Schedules boards of review.
Hospitality Coordinator
  • Coordinates food for courts of honor and other activities as necessary.
Transportation Coordinator
  • Coordinates appropriate rides to activities
  • Manages online signups for rides.
Training Coordinator
  • Manages troop training records
  • Ensures all required training has been taken and documented.
Communications Coordinator
  • Takes minutes at monthly committee meetings.
  • Submits articles to the local newspapers to announce the achievements of our Eagle Scouts
  • Maintains the Google group email list which is the primary means of communication with the troop
Webmaster
  • Regularly updates the website with current information
  • Maintains the Eagle Scout Roll Call

Committee Meetings
The troop committee meets monthly to discuss troop business. Committee meetings are scheduled by the Troop Committee Chair, who will provide a written agenda. The meetings are open to all adults. Meetings are governed by the Troop 216 Handbook and Guide and operate according to Robert’s Rules of Order .

Training
Committee members are required to take the online course Troop Committee Challenge, found on the my.scouting.org website. They are also required to take Youth Protection training and SET (Safe Environment Training).

Approval
Should a need arise to obtain committee approval of an expenditure on an expedited basis, the Committee Chair shall be authorized to contact the minimum committee members by telephone or email to discuss the matter and conduct a vote. In any such instance where a telephone or email vote has been conducted, the results of that vote shall be ratified at the next regular committee meeting.

Each committee member shall be entitled to one vote.  A quorum is defined as all those present at a given troop committee meeting, who are eligible to vote (registered committee member), but in no case can fewer than 5 members be declared as a quorum.

Amendments to the Troop 216 Handbook and Guide may be made by simple majority vote during any committee meeting.
2.2.6 Adult Leaders (Scouters)
Every Boy Scout troop will have one Scoutmaster and one or more assistant Scoutmasters. They are commonly referred to as Scouters. The role of the Scouters in the troop is to ensure a program that is fun and safe and gives the Scouts opportunities to advance through the ranks of Scouting. The Scouters generally will have the closest contact with the Scouts as they will attend most of the meetings, campouts and activities with the Scouts.

Scoutmaster
The Scoutmaster is the adult leader responsible for the image and program of the troop. The Scoutmaster and assistant Scoutmasters work directly with the Scouts. The importance of the Scoutmaster's job is reflected in the fact that the quality of guidance will affect every youth and adult involved in the troop.

The Scoutmaster plans, attends or participates in a number of meetings.  He…
  1. Meets regularly with adult leaders to coordinate efforts in support of the program.
  2. Meets regularly with the patrol leaders council (PLC) for training and coordination in planning troop activities.
  3. Attends all troop meetings or when necessary, arrange for a qualified adult substitute.
  4. Attends troop committee meetings.
  5. Conducts periodic parents' sessions to share the program and encourage parent participation and cooperation.
  6. Takes part in annual planning meeting and any charter presentation.

The Scoutmaster also provides guidance to the troop in a variety of ways.  He…
  1. Conducts Scoutmaster conferences for Star, Life and Eagle rank advancements.
  2. Arranges for trained assistant Scoutmasters to conduct Scoutmaster conferences for all other ranks.
  3. Prepares and conduct a systematic recruiting plan for new members and see they are promptly registered.
  4. Delegates responsibility to other adults and groups (assistants, troop committee) so they have a real part in troop operations.
  5. Makes sure the senior patrol leader is on task with fulfilling the programs instituted by the patrol leaders council.
  6. Meets with and approve candidates for SPL and ASPL as well as candidates for Order of the Arrow.
  7. Supervises annual troop elections and elections for the Order of the Arrow.

The Scoutmaster provides appropriate opportunities for the Scouts.  He…
  1. Offers each Scout at least 10 days & nights of camping per year, exclusive of summer camp.
  2. Participates in council & district events as troop representative, or delegate a suitable ASM.
  3. Builds a strong program by using proven methods of the BSA.
  4. Conducts all activities under qualified leadership, safe conditions, and the policies of the chartered organization and the BSA.

The Scoutmaster…
  • Has full responsibility for all program decisions of the troop.
  • Serves at the pleasure of the chartered organization and troop committee.
  • Shall be elected from a list of approved candidates by a majority of voting troop committee members where a defined quorum is present.
  • Has no specific term of service.
  • Looks for a replacement as soon as they are sworn in. J

In the absence of the Scoutmaster, the Scoutmaster shall designate an assistant Scoutmaster to serve in his/her place as troop adult leader-in-charge.

The Scoutmaster is expected to serve a minimum of one year ending at the beginning of the Program Year.  The Scoutmaster may continue to hold the position upon approval by troop.  If at any time the Scoutmaster fails to meet the qualifications or fulfill the duties of the position, that person shall be removed.

The Scoutmaster will complete all required training for the position as soon as possible. The Scoutmaster is encouraged to attend Wood Badge training.

Assistant Scoutmasters (ASM)
The uniformed adult leaders operate under the direction and control of the Scoutmaster. Their duties are to train and guide boy leaders, and to use the methods of Scouting to achieve the aims of Scouting.  They stand in for the Scoutmaster when necessary and do a variety of other tasks for the troop, including working with the newer Scouts to get them up to speed on troop activities, signing off on rank requirements, and ensuring that the troop has service projects planned during the year. 

It is expected all uniformed adult leaders to take the basic Scout leader training offered by the local BSA district and to read the Scout Handbook and Scoutmaster Handbook.  They are also required to take Youth Protection training and SET (Safe Environment Training).

Assistant Scoutmasters serve with the Scoutmaster’s supervision to guide the youth in their experiences as Scouts. Assistant Scoutmasters serve at the pleasure of the Scoutmaster and troop committee. They may be removed only by joint action of the Scoutmaster and troop committee. This does not preclude the Scoutmaster’s authority to dismiss a leader from a troop activity for cause, pending later action of the troop committee. The assistant Scoutmasters also serve as mentors to the patrol leaders and assistant patrol leaders. A list of the current Scoutmaster and assistant Scoutmasters are available on the troop website.

The assistant Scoutmaster…
  
  • Shall be appointed with the approval of the Scoutmaster and the troop committee.
  • Number can vary with troop size, but will have at least a number equal to number of patrols.
  • Assists the Scoutmaster in conducting the troop program, giving guidance to the SPL and other troop leadership positions in leading the troop.
  • Provide support and assistance during troop meetings, campouts, and at other troop events.
  • Is expected to complete all required training for the position as soon as possible.
  • Is expected to wear their BSA uniform during all troop activities.
  • Is strongly encouraged to take Wood Badge training.

2.2.7 Scouts
The Senior Patrol Leader (SPL); Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL)
The senior patrol leader and the assistant senior patrol leader(s) run troop meetings. The SPL and ASPL are elected by the troop.  All other troop offices other than patrol leader and assistant patrol leader are appointed by the SPL and Scoutmaster. The SPL shall be a Star Scout or above. The term of office for most Scout positions in the troop is six months (January-June) or (July-December). Certain offices specifically junior assistant Scoutmaster, webmaster, troop guide and den chief are appointed by the Scoutmaster and normally hold a one year term in that office although some of these can be reappointed as needed.

The Patrol Leader Council (PLC)
The PLC is comprised of the SPL, ASPL, PL's, and other troop officeholders. Meetings are held once a month on the 3 rd Tuesday in place of a troop meeting. The SPL presides over the PLC and the Scoutmaster attends to offer support and guidance, and to act as a liaison between the PLC and the troop committee.

Patrols
The patrol Method is the most important and distinctive characteristic of Scouting, and it is one of Scouting's eight methods. Only the senior patrol leader, the assistant senior patrol leader(s), and any junior assistant Scoutmasters are not in patrols. The Scoutmaster may choose to assign patrols. Each patrol elects its own patrol leader, who represents the patrol on the patrol leader council. Patrols function as described in the Scout Handbook and Scoutmaster Handbook.

New Scouts Patrol
The New Scouts Patrol is a special Troop 216 feature (adopted by the BSA in 1989) that has helped increase retention of younger Scouts. All new Scouts are placed in the New Scouts Patrol upon joining Troop 216, where they receive special training under the guidance of a senior Scout (troop guide) appointed by the senior patrol leader with Scoutmaster approval.
2.2.8 Communications
Information needing to be communicated to the troop will be done either in person or electronically.

In Person
During troop meetings and events, information is conveyed to Scouts from the SPL, Scoutmaster or a Scouter.  Scouts are encouraged to take notes to convey information to their parents. 

Electronic
Troop Website
The troop maintains a “public” website () where most information may be obtained on this site and a current calendar of events and rosters of adult leaders and committee members are maintained.  There is NO public access list of Scouts.  The purpose of the web site is to inform troop families, promote the troop to potential members, and help other troops and Scout leaders benefit from the troop’s experience. Keeping in mind the public nature of the Internet, the Troop Webmaster will take care not to publish names, dates, or other information that could be used for harmful purposes.

Troop Webhost
The troop also maintains a “private” website ( http://www.troopwebhost.org/Troop216Cary/ ) for administrative records and troop operations.  It includes a Scout’s records, troop rosters and contact information, activity signups and more.  This site requires a userid and password to access.  Contact the Scoutmaster for further information on obtaining login credentials. 

It’s IMPORTANT to access and check your records in TROOP WEBHOST


Email
The troop maintains three email lists for proactive communication. 
  1. bsa-troop-216-cary@googlegroups.com
    Sent to the whole troop. (both Scouts & adults).  It is moderated by the troop committee so messages submitted need to be approved prior to being sent out
  2. t216carycommittee@googlegroups.com
    Sent to the troop committee members only.  Must be on the list in order to have messages sent to the group.
  3. t216caryleaders@googlegroups.com
    Sent to the assistant Scoutmasters only.  Must be on the list in order to have messages sent to the group.

Chain of Communication
It is also important to note that there is a chain for communications from Scouts or parents.  If they have questions about a campout or troop activity, they should first ask their patrol leader, then the senior patrol leader.  If they still haven’t gotten the information they need, they should then contact the ASM in charge of the activity. 

ONLY AS A LAST RESORT should the Scoutmaster be contacted.  There are over 70 Scouts in the troop and the Scoutmaster, as good as he is, unfortunately doesn’t have the time to answer every email about information that has been covered in a prior troop email or troop meeting.  Please follow the chain of communication before contacting the Scoutmaster.

 Also, don’t forget to check the website for answers to your basic questions.

Scouts should be the ones to initiate the questions themselves as this is a boy-led organization.  However, emails CAN NOT be sent just between the Scout and an adult leader.  There has to be 2 deep leadership in emails as well so a parent or another adult leader needs to be included.  Make sure the Scout knows that email just between themselves and one adult is a no-no!
2.3 Youth Leadership
 2.3.1 “Boy Led”
The term “boy-lead” troop is used a lot in Scouting. Every troop has its own unique mixture of Scout and adult leadership and direction. A “boy-lead” troop is always under the guidance of adult leaders.  The Scouts have the major role in deciding Troop 216's direction and activities.

The senior patrol leader (SPL) is an elected troop-wide leadership position. He is elected for a six month term and may not succeed himself, except under special circumstances. The SPL is the “boy” leader of the troop; the Scoutmaster becomes the consultant and guide.  There are several other elected and appointed positions for Scouts to earn leadership time for advancement to higher ranks.

New patrol leaders are elected approximately every six months. Scouts are responsible for fulfilling his duties as patrol leader, the Scoutmaster works with and reviews a Scout’s performance of his duties. The Scoutmaster will perform periodic reviews during the 6 month leadership position for each boy who holds a leadership position.

Retaining leadership roles are contingent on fulfilling responsibilities and duties.

New Scout patrols may be assigned troop guides in lieu of an elected patrol leader. A troop guide is a more experienced Scout who will act as the patrol’s consultant and teacher.

The patrol leaders council (PLC) is the Scout group responsible for planning troop meetings and activities. The PLC is comprised of:
  
  • senior patrol leader (SPL)
  • assistant senior patrol leader (ASPL)
  • patrol leaders (PL)
  • troop guides
  • troop scribe (non-voting)
  • Other Scout leadership positions

The PLC meets once a month, presided over by the SPL. At these monthly meetings, the Scouts evaluate, plan and organize troop-wide activities. Other Scouts or adults may be invited to attend the PLC, but they do not vote.

It is the goal of the adult leadership in Troop 216 to make our troop as “boy-lead” as possible. As our Scouts mature into young men, they will shoulder more and more responsibility for organizing troop events and activities. However, the adult leaders of Troop 216 will always monitor activities for safety and practicality.
2.3.2 Youth Training
The troop recognizes the importance and benefit of qualified youth leaders in the troop.  Leadership development is one of Scouting's eight methods. For Scouts above First Class, leadership and service are more important than earning merit badges. The troop's boy leaders are responsible for planning and executing the troop program.

YLT
Troop 216 provides Youth Leadership training twice a year.  Training typically falls on the 2nd or 3rd Saturday of August and the 1st or 2nd Saturday in January.  This one day session introduces the skills of leadership and the tools Scouts will use to implement their vision of adventure and leadership in their role as a youth leader in the troop.  The training is delivered by Scouters and older more experienced Scouts. 

NYLT
Annually the Council offers National Youth Leader Training (NYLT). To be able to attend this training, Scouts must be at least 13 years of age and First Class or above. Candidates must possess strong leadership skills, have a desire to better themselves, and regularly attend and participate in troop meetings and activities. Participation requires approval of the Scoutmaster. Normally the troop will send a maximum of two Scouts to training annually, however may elect to send more depending on the size and needs of the troop. To ensure an adequate group of trained Scouts the troop may pay a portion of the fee for this training. The remaining portion of the fee is the Scout’s responsibility.
2.3.3 Troop Elections
Troop elections will be held semi-annually for senior patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader and patrol leader positions. Elections will be overseen by the Scoutmaster, and will be by secret ballot. Adult leaders are not allowed to vote.
  
  • Troop elections will be held in December and in May.
  • Terms of office are to be six (6) months.
  • Patrol elections will be held the same night as troop elections, immediately after the troop election.
  • A Scout does not have to be present to be elected, but must have given his request to the Scoutmaster to be considered for the position.
  • Consecutive terms in the same office are permitted only with the approval of the Scoutmaster.
  • Signups for the ballot MUST be done 1 week in advance of the actual election.
2.3.4 Order of the Arrow Elections
Founded in 1915 by Dr. E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson, The Order of the Arrow is Scouting’s National Honor Society. The purpose of the Order of the Arrow is fourfold:
  • To recognize those Scout campers who best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives
  • To develop and maintain camping traditions and spirit
  • To promote Scout camping
  • To crystallize the Scout habit of helpfulness into a life purpose of leadership in cheerful service to others

Scouts are elected to the Order by their fellow unit members, following approval by the Scoutmaster. Elections are held annually typically in January or February.

At least half of the registered active youth in a unit must be present before a unit election can be held and a candidate must receive at least 50% of the votes from the voting membership.

To be eligible for election to OA, a youth must be a registered member of a Boy Scout troop or Varsity Scout team and hold First Class rank. The youth must have experienced fifteen days and nights of Boy Scout camping during the two-year period prior to the election. The fifteen days and nights must include one, but no more than one, long-term camp consisting of six consecutive days and five nights of resident camping, approved and under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America. The balance of the camping must be overnight, weekend, or other short-term camps. The Scoutmaster is responsible for determining whether a Scout has met the camping requirements for eligibility.

Adult selection is based on their ability to perform the necessary functions to help the Order fulfill its purpose, and is not for recognition. Selected adult Scouters must be an asset to the Order because of demonstrated abilities, and provide a positive role model for the youth members of the lodge.

Once a Scout has been elected into the Order he attends the induction ceremony, called the Ordeal. This is the first step toward full membership. During the experience, candidates maintain silence, receive small amounts of food, work on camp improvement projects, and are required to sleep alone, apart from other campers. The entire experience is designed to teach significant values.

If the member fails to complete the Ordeal within one year from being elected, the member will have to be re-elected by the troop.  It is the Scout’s responsibility to pay for their Ordeal and OA membership dues.


2.3.5 Boy Scout Held Positions

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL)
Age/Rank requirements:           
14 years old, at least Star and former ASPL
Reports to:                                   
Scoutmaster
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Senior Patrol Leader is the top boy leader of the troop. He is responsible for the troop’s overall operation. With guidance from the Scoutmaster, he takes charge of troop meetings, of the Patrol Leaders’ Council, and of all troop activities.  He does everything he can to help each patrol be successful and is responsible for semi-annual program planning conferences and assists the Scoutmaster in conducting Youth Leadership Training. The SPL presides over the PLC and works closely with each Patrol Leader to plan troop meetings and make arrangements for troop activities.
Appointment:
All members of the troop vote by secret ballot.
Duties:                                           
  • Preside at all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference.
  • Chair the Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) meeting once a month.
  • Reports monthly to the troop Committee about the upcoming troop schedule.
  • Assists the Scoutmaster and assistant Scoutmasters in training junior leaders.
  • Delegates task to the ASPLs. Makes sure an ASPL attends any meeting or function he will not be able to attend (troop, PLC, Committee Meeting, etc.)
  • Assign duties and responsibilities to other junior leaders as needed.
  • Oversees planning efforts of Scouts for all troop campouts (whether he attends the outing or not).
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 5/6 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example to both younger and older Scouts.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.
                

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL)
Age/Rank requirements:           
13 years old, at least Star and former Patrol Leader
Reports to:                                   
Senior Patrol Leader
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader works closely with the Senior Patrol Leader to help the
troop move forward and serves as acting SPL when the SPL is absent.  Among his specific duties, the ASPL trains and provides direction to the Quartermaster, Scribe, Historian, Webmaster, Librarian, Instructors, troop Guides and Order of the Arrow representative. During his tenure as ASPL he is not a member of a patrol, but he may participate in the high-adventure activities of a Venture patrol. Troop 216 has two or more ASPLs.  One is in charge of the PLC positions and the other is in charge of young Scout development. 
Appointment:
All members of the troop vote by secret ballot.
Duties:                                           
  • Help with leading meetings and activities as called upon by the Senior Patrol Leader.
  • Take over troop leadership in the absence of the Senior Patrol Leader.
  • Be responsible for training and giving direct leadership to the following appointed junior leaders: Scribe, Librarian, troop Historian, Webmaster, Instructor, Quartermaster, troop Guides and Chaplain Aide.
  • Perform tasks assigned by the Senior Patrol Leader.
  • Assign duties and responsibilities to other junior leaders as needed.
  • Oversees the planning efforts of Scouts for all troop campouts (whether attending or not).
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 5/6 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example to both younger and older Scouts.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Patrol Leader (PL)
Age/Rank requirements:           
11 years old or earned Arrow of Light
Reports to:                                   
SPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Patrol Leader is the top leader of a Patrol. He represents the Patrol at all Patrol Leaders’ Council meetings and the semi-annual program planning conferences and keeps Patrol members informed of decisions made. He plays a key role in planning, leading, and evaluating Patrol meetings and activities and prepares the Patrol to participate in all troop activities. The Patrol Leader learns about the abilities of other Patrol members and fully involves them in Patrol and troop activities by assigning them specific tasks and responsibilities. He encourages Patrol members to complete advancement requirements and sets a good example by continuing to pursue his own advancement. 
Appointment:
Elected by the members of his Patrol.
Duties:                                           
  • Plan and lead Patrol meetings and activities.
  • Keep patrol members informed.
  • Assign each Patrol member a job and help them succeed.
  • Represent the Patrol at all Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) meetings and at the semi-annual program planning conference.
  • Prepares the Patrol to take part in all troop activities.
  • Develop patrol spirit.
  • Regularly attends troop meetings, troop campouts, and troop events during his service period.
  • Work with other troop leaders to make the troop run well.
  • Know what Patrol members and other leaders can do.
Expectations:
  • Sets a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Assistant Patrol Leader (APL)
Age/Rank requirements:           
11 years old or earned Arrow of Light
Reports to:                                   
SPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Assistant Patrol Leader is the second in command leader of a Patrol. He represents the Patrol at all Patrol Leaders’ Council meetings and the semi-annual program planning conferences and keeps the Patrol Leader informed of decisions made if the Patrol Leader cannot make one of the meetings.  He encourages Patrol members to complete advancement requirements and sets a good example by continuing to pursue his own advancement.  .  This leadership position is not one of those counted toward rank advancement.
Appointment:
Elected by the members of his Patrol
Duties:                                           
  • Plan and lead Patrol meetings and activities in case of the PL's absence.
  • Keep patrol members informed in case of the PL's absence.
  • Assign each Patrol member a job and help them succeed in case of the PL's absence.
  • Represent the Patrol at all Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) meetings and at the semi-annual program planning conference in case of the PL's absence.
  • Prepares the Patrol to take part in all troop activities in case of the PL's absence.
  • Develop patrol spirit.
  • Regularly attends troop meetings, troop campouts, and troop events during his service period.
  • Work with other troop leaders to make the troop run well in case of the PL's absence.
  • Know what Patrol members and other leaders can do.
Expectations:
  • Sets a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM)
Age/Rank requirements:           
16 years old and Life, a former SPL or an Eagle Scout
Reports to:                                   
Scoutmaster
Term Length:                               
6+ months starting any time
Job Description:                           
A Scout at least 16 years of age and a Life Scout, a former SPL or an Eagle Scout who has shown outstanding leadership skills may be appointed by the Scoutmaster, to serve as a Junior Assistant Scoutmaster. These young men follow the guidance of the Scoutmaster in providing support and supervision to other boy leaders in the troop. The Junior Assistant Scoutmaster serves in the capacity of an Assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. Upon his 18th birthday, a JASM will be eligible to become an Assistant Scoutmaster.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Function as an Assistant Scoutmaster (except for leadership responsibilities reserved for adults18 and 21 years of age or older).
  • Accomplish any duties assigned by the Scoutmaster.
  • Sign off on rank advancement requirements, except Scoutmaster Conferences, for Scout through 1 st Class ranks.
  • Assist with the Scouting Skills development of younger Scouts.
Expectations:
  • Sets a good example to both younger and older Scouts.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.

***This position looks great on a job application***


Troop Guide (TG)
Age/Rank requirements:           
13 years old and at least First Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
12 months (January – December)
Job Description:                           
The troop Guide is both a leader and a mentor to the members of the new-Scout Patrol.  He should be an older Scout who holds at least the First Class rank and can work well with younger Scouts. He helps the Patrol Leader of the new-Scout Patrol in much the same way that a Scoutmaster works with a Senior Patrol Leader to provide direction, coaching, and support. The troop Guide becomes a member of the new-Scout Patrol for his term, but may participate in the high-adventure activities of a Venture patrol.  The troop Guides introduce new Scouts to troop operations and help them feel comfortable in the troop.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Help new Scouts earn advancement requirements through their first year and try to get them to First Class.
  • Advise patrol leader on his duties and responsibilities at PLC meetings.
  • Attend Patrol Leaders Council (PLC) meetings with the new-Scout Patrol Leader.
  • Prevent harassment of new Scouts by older Scouts.
  • Help Assistant Scoutmasters train new Scouts by leveraging the skills of older Scouts.
  • Guide new Scouts through early troop experiences to help them become comfortable in the troop and the outdoors.
  • Teach basic Scout skills.
Expectations:
  • Have good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Set a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Den Chief (DC)
Age/Rank requirements:           
12 years old and at least 1st Class
Reports to:                                   
Den Leader and SPL
Term Length:                               
1 -5 years as needed by the Den Leader
Job Description:                           
The Den Chief works with a Den of Cub Scouts and with their adult leaders. He takes part in Den meetings, encourages Cub Scout advancement, and is a role model for younger boys. A Webelos Den Chief can help plan and assist with the leadership of Webelos den meetings and field activities. He can lead songs and skits, and encourage Webelos Scouts to progress into the Boy Scout troop.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Serve as the activities assistant at Den meetings.
  • Meet regularly with the Den Leader to review the Den and Pack meeting plans.
  • If serving as a Webelos Den Chief, prepare boys to join Boy Scouting.
  • Project a positive image of Boy Scouting.
  • Know the purposes of Cub Scouting.
  • Encourage Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation.
  • Help out at weekly Den meetings and monthly Pack meetings.
Expectations:
  • Regularly attends troop meetings, troop campouts, and troop events during his service period.
  • Be a friend to the boys in the Den.
  • Set a good example.
  • Wear the Scout uniform correctly.
  • Live by Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show scout Spirit.


OA Troop Representative (OATR)
Age/Rank requirements:           
OA Member in good standing, approved by the Scoutmaster
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
12 months (January – December)
Job Description:                           
The Order of the Arrow representative serves as a communication link between the Troop and the local Order of the Arrow Lodge. By enhancing the image of the Order as a service arm to the troop, he promotes the Order, encourages Scouts to take part in all sorts of camping opportunities, and helps pave the way for older Scouts to become involved in high-adventure programs. The OA troop Representative assists with leadership skills training. He reports to the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Serves as a communication link between the Lodge or Chapter and the troop.
  • Encourages year round and resident camping in the troop.
  • Encourages older Scout participation in high adventure programs.
  • Encourages Scouts to actively participate in community service projects.
  • Assists with leadership skills training in the troop.
  • Encourages Arrowmen to assume leadership positions in the troop.
  • Encourages Arrowmen in the troop to be active participants in the Lodge and/or Chapter activities and to seal their membership in the Order by becoming Brotherhood members.
Expectations:
  • Regularly attends troop meetings, troop campouts, and troop events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example to both younger and older Scouts. 
  • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly.
  • Lives by the Scout Oath, Scout Law and OA Obligation.
  • Shows Scout spirit


Scribe
Age/Rank requirements:
1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Scribe is the troop’s secretary. He attends meetings of the Patrol Leaders’ Council and keeps a record of the discussions, then sends the troop meeting plans to the troop Webmaster to be uploaded to the troop's website. He cooperates with the Patrol Scribes to record attendance at troop meetings and to maintain troop advancement records. A member of the troop committee may assist him with his work.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Attend and keep a log of Patrol Leaders' Council (PLC) Meetings. 
  • Sends the troop meeting plans to the troop Webmaster. 
  • Record attendance at troop functions.
  • Record advancement in troop records.
  • Work with the troop committee member responsible for finance, records, and advancement.
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 5/6 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Quartermaster
Age/Rank requirements:           
1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:           
The Quartermaster is the troop’s supply boss. He keeps an inventory of troop equipment and sees that the gear is in good condition. He works with Patrol Quartermasters as they check out equipment and return it, and at meetings of the Patrol Leaders’ Council he reports on the status of equipment in need of replacement or repair. In carrying out his responsibilities, he may have the guidance of a member of the troop committee.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Keep records on Patrol and troop equipment.
  • Send inventory list to the troop Webmaster.
  • Work to update Troop Web Host with the equipment inventory.
  • Keep equipment in good repair.
  • Issue equipment and see that it is returned in good order.
  • Follow up on late returns (at least one troop meeting after the equipment was signed out).
  • Suggest new or replacement items.
  • Work with the troop committee member responsible for equipment.
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 5/6 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Instructor
Age/Rank requirements:           
14 years old, 1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
Each instructor is an older troop member proficient in a Scouting skill. He must also have the ability to teach that skill to others. An instructor typically teaches subjects that Scouts are eager to learn—especially those such as first aid, camping, and backpacking—that are required for outdoor activities and rank advancement. A troop can have more than one instructor as determined by the Scoutmaster.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Instruct Scouting skills as needed within the troop or Patrols on at least four separate occasions during his service period.
  • Prepare well in advance for each teaching assignment. 
Expectations:
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the troop meetings during his service period. 
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Attends the New Scout Camp out if it occurs during his term.  Sets a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Librarian
Age/Rank requirements:           
1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The troop Librarian oversees the care and use of troop books, pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge counselor lists. He checks out these materials to Scouts and leaders and maintains records to ensure that everything is returned. He may also suggest the acquisition of new literature and report the need to repair or replace any current holdings.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Establish and take care of the troop library.
  • Keep records on literature owned by the troop and update the Webmaster with the inventory throughout his service period. 
  • Work to update Troop Web Host with the library inventory
  • Add new or replacement items as needed.
  • Keep books and pamphlets available for borrowing at troop meetings.
  • Keep a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out.
  • Follow up on late returns (more than 1 month after checkout).
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example to both younger and older Scouts.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Historian
Age/Rank requirements:           
1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Historian keeps a historical record of troop events, collects and preserves troop photographs, news stories, trophies, flags, scrapbooks, awards, and other memorabilia and makes materials available for Scouting activities, the media, and troop history projects. The troop may have up to two Historians, at the Scoutmaster's discretion, and they are both responsible for ensuring ALL troop activities are properly documented.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Gather pictures and facts about all troop activities and sends them to the Webmaster for inclusion onto the troop's website.
  • Keeps troop scrapbooks, wall displays and informational (historical) files.
  • Take care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities.
  • Keep information about former members of the troop. 
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Sets a good example to both younger and older Scouts.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Chaplain Aide (CA)
Age/Rank requirements:           
1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Chaplain Aide works with the troop Chaplain in serving the religious needs of the troop. He ensures that religious holidays are considered during the troop’s program planning process and promotes the BSA’s religious emblems program. He ensures the troop is Reverent.  Ideally, he would obtain Chaplain Aide specific training before his term starts (typically at summer camp).
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Keeps troop leadership appraised of religious holidays when planning activities.
  • Assist Chaplain or religious coordinator in meeting the religious needs of troop members while on activities.
  • Ensures opening and closing prayers are included in Courts of Honor.
  • Ensures every campout has a Scouts Own Service.
  • Encourage saying grace at meals while camping or on activities.
  • Tell Scouts about the religious emblem program of their faith.
  • Help plan for religious observance in troop activities.

Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends semi-annual event planning conference.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Webmaster
Age/Rank requirements:           
1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
12 months (July – June)
Job Description:                         
The troop webmaster is responsible for maintaining the troop’s website. Other Scouts will send him information to update to the troop website.  He should make sure that information posted on the website is correct and up to date and that members’ and leaders’ privacy is protected. A member of the troop committee will assist him with his work.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Ensure the troop's website is up to date with the most current information available.
  • Ensures forms and documents on the troop's website are correct and at the most current version.
  • Receive information from other Scouts about troop equipment, library and events, then proofread to make sure personal information is removed, then upload to the troop website.
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Leave No Trace Trainer (LNTT)
Age/Rank requirements:           
1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Leave No Trace Trainer specializes in teaching Leave No Trace principles and ensuring that the troop follows these principles on outings. He can also help Scouts earn the Leave No Trace award. He should have a thorough understanding of and commitment to Leave No Trace. Ideally, he should have completed Leave No Trace training and earned the Camping and Environmental Science merit badges.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Ensures Scouts properly clean up after all troop activities (meetings, COH, picnics, campouts …).
  • Promote Scouts earning the Leave No Trace and World Conservation awards.
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Bugler
Age/Rank requirements:           
1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Bugler plays the bugle (or a similar interest) to mark key moments during the day on troop outings or at troop events, such as taps, reveille and lights out. He must know the required bugle calls and should ideally have earned the Bugling merit badge.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Plays bugle as requested by troop leadership.
  • Plays reveille to wake up Scouts during troop campouts.
  • Plays taps during evening closing ceremony.
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example to both younger and older Scouts.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.


Standard Bearer (SB)
Age/Rank requirements:           
1st Class
Reports to:                                   
ASPL
Term Length:                               
6 months (January – June) or (July – December)
Job Description:                           
The Standard Bearer oversees the care and use of troop flags and rank standards. He ensures that everything is in proper presentable order and trains Patrols on proper flag ceremonies.  He makes sure the flags are present at all troop meetings and Courts of Honor. He reports the need to repair or replace any standards.
Appointment: By SPL and Scoutmaster
Duties:                                           
  • Prepares Patrols for troop meeting and event flag ceremonies.
  • Ensures troop flags are present at all meetings and events. 
  • Help teach younger Scouts proper flag etiquette.
Expectations:
  • Has good attendance at troop meetings.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the PLC meetings occurring during his service period.
  • Attends at least 2/3 of the monthly events during his service period.
  • Sets a good example to both younger and older Scouts.
  • Enthusiastically wear the Scout Uniform correctly.
  • Live by the Scout Oath and Law.
  • Show Scout spirit.